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Netflix’s ‘Gambling, Explained’ and the Evolving Public Perception of Gambling

  Netflix’s ‘Gambling, Explained’ and the Evolving Public Perception of Gambling Eliscia Siu-Lin Liang Sinclair and Luke Clark   “The gambling industry is built on losers”  Netflix’s Gambling, Explained   How to cite:  Sinclair, E. S.-L. L., & Clark, L. (2021). Netflix’s ‘Gambling, Explained’ and the Evolving Public Perception of Gambling.  Critical Gambling Studies . https://doi.org/10.29173/cgs128 This non-peer reviewed entry is published as part of the Critical Gambling Studies Blog.    Gambling, Explained is the fourth installment in Netflix’s limited docuseries Money, Explained , which features other episodes on credit cards, retirement, and student loans. Gambling is often sensationalized in Hollywood films (e.g., Casino Royale , The Hangover , Ocean’s Eleven ), but the portrayal of gambling within popular culture, including film, TV and music, provides a barometer of how well public perceptions of gambling align with current academic discussions of gambling

“Gaming Addiction” and the Politics of Pathologies

  “Gaming Addiction” and the Politics of Pathologies Mark R. Johnson How to cite: Johnson, M. R. (2021). “Gaming Addiction” and the Politics of Pathologies.  Critical Gambling Studies . https://doi.org/10.29173/cgs126 This non-peer reviewed entry is published as part of the Critical Gambling Studies Blog.  The ever-looming spectre of “addiction” has been associated with gambling practices since long before “gambling studies”, or indeed any scholarly consideration of real-money game activities, came into being. Interested parties ranging from literary authors to state legislators, and from religious inquisitors to urban planners, have long considered the experience, risk or ramifications of gambling addiction to be inseparable from the practice itself.   We presently stand at a moment where a different and relatively new activity – digital gaming - is beginning to be transformed into a vector for addiction. By examining how this is happening, what might we learn about the political p

Gambling Self-Exclusion Programmes in Australia: Are They Really Effective?

  Gambling Self-Exclusion Programmes in Australia: Are They Really Effective? Juan Zhang  How to cite: Zhang, J. (2021). Gambling Self-Exclusion Programmes in Australia: Are They Really Effective?  Critical Gambling Studies . https://doi.org/10.29173/cgs120 This non-peer reviewed entry is published as part of the Critical Gambling Studies Blog.    Problem Gambling and Self-Exclusion in Australia In Australia, problem gambling has been recognised as a “serious problem” for the past two decades with widely recorded negative impacts on individuals, communities, and society . Gambling has been directly associated with problems of addiction, crime, financial hardship, mental health, family and relationship breakdowns, costing the public at least $7 billion according to a 2017 report published by the Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation. To address the challenges presented by problem gambling, self-exclusion programs have been rolled out across Australia in different ga